Central Penn College - Building Names

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Central Penn College's History

Campus Building Names

As you walk across campus, you will find many of the buildings, student housing, and other structures boast the name of an individual.  Each was named to honor someone who held a special place in the hearts of President Emeritus Bart Milano, his wife Jean, and current President Todd A. Milano.  These individuals shared the College's core values of integrity, professionalism, service, respect and educational focus, and played a role in Central Penn's success.

Student apartments Gale, Todd and Teri are named for Bart and Jean's children; Anne Hall bears Jean's middle name; Fred and Kathi Hall are named in memory of two children - Fred Neumann and Kathi Spragg.  The Neumanns and the Spraggs were close friends of Bart and Jean Milano.  Both of these children left this world too soon.  Bollinger Hall is named in honor of Elizabeth G. Bollinger, who taught shorthand at Central Penn for 15 years.  Bart A. Milano Hall, once known as the East Wing, was dedicated and renamed to honor President Emeritus Bart A. Milano, who served as the College's president from 1969 to 1989.  The Boyer House is named in honor of the Boyer family who built and occupied the home for more than 200 years.  The College purchased the Boyer Farm from Catherine Boyer in March 1999.  Henzsey's Bridge kept its name when it traveled across three counties to rest on Central Penn's Summerdale campus.  Its journey began with College President Todd A. Milano's vision of using an old bridge to cross the chasm and join both parts of campus.  The Charles "T" Jones Leadership Library is named to honor its benefactor and good friend, Charles "Tremendous" Jones.  The Craiger C. Parker Amphitheatre honors Dean Parker, who lost his battle to cancer while working at Central Penn, and recognizes his leadership, military and community service, as well as his dedication and service to the College.   

To learn more about all of the buildings on campus, explore the boxes below.

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Anne Hall

Each year enrollment increased and a sixth residence hall was added. It bore Jean Milano's middle name - Anne.  Jean began her career in 1969 when her husband Bart acquired the school.  Mrs. Milano worked full-time through 1974 and part-time for a good many years thereafter.  Her responsibilities included everything from teaching to admissions to interviews to school registrar.  She was known for her uncanny ability to remember and recognize each student by name, a gift which she still possesses.  Mrs. Milano continues to support Central Penn through contributions to the College's Education Foundation.  She retired in 1989, the same year that her son, Todd, became president of the College.

ATEC (Advanced Technology Education Center)

The ATEC (Advanced Technology Education Center) opened in January 2002.  The three story building doubled the size of the College's academic buildings, and houses classrooms, a conference center and Student Union. In 2006, a $1,000,000 learning facility was added that includes a crime lab, a physical therapist assistant clinic, and a medical assisting lab. 

Bart A. Milano Hall

The first academic building constructed on the Summerdale campus, opened in the fall of 1970.  At that time, the building served as the main entrance, reception area, administrative/faculty offices and classrooms, and did not have an 'official name' until a new building was needed.  The second building connected to the first with an enclosed breezeway and was named the West Wing; the original building took the name East Wing. On October 5, 1997, the East Wing was dedicated and renamed to honor President Emeritus Bart A. Milano, who served as the College's president from 1969 to 1989.  

Bollinger Hall

The two-story academic building opened in 1973 and one year later was named in honor of Elizabeth G. Bollinger, who taught shorthand at Central Pennsylvania Business School from 1960 to 1975.  Known as a taskmaster, she was the one instructor all graduates wanted to see when they returned to boast about their successes.  Countless careers can be attributed to this grand dame of the Gregg Shorthand method. In 1974, Mrs. Bollinger was named "Outstanding Educator of America" on the basis of her professional and civic achievements and also was named Central Penn's first Faculty Member Emeritus.  A scholarship was established in her name by Bart and Jean Milano.  During Bart's lifetime, he began and maintained 'newspaper galleries' that shared significant moments in history with those who walked its halls.  

Boyer House

Named in honor of the Boyer family who built and occupied the home for more than 200 years, the College purchased the Boyer Farm from Catherine Boyer on March 19, 1999. The president promised Mrs. Boyer that he would restore the stone house and dedicate it to the Boyer Family.  The Boyer House serves as office space for the College president's team.  In addition, the Historical Society of East Pennsboro Township maintains two rooms showcasing memorabilia of the township's past. More than 1,000 people have toured the Boyer House. 

Charles "T" Jones Leadership Library

Named for benefactor and friend Charles "Tremendous" Jones. In 2002, the building was transformed and enlarged to afford more room for books and provide a place for students to work on computers, study, and meet with classmates and professors in the Leadership Room. The original building was constructed in 1971 and was known as Penn's Palace; it was later renamed The Knight Club to acknowledge Central Penn's mascot: a knight in shining armor.  Bart A. Milano wanted Central Penn to have a family atmosphere, and this building provided a place for students to relax and fellowship in front of a cozy fireplace which conveys a feeling of 'home.' The fireplace continues to lend that family atmosphere to the library, and Charlie Jones' portrait now hangs above it, inspiring students and visitors to read, read, read.  Through the friendship with Charlie Jones, many world-renown authors and speakers visited Central Penn and inspired many at local events.

Craiger C. Parker Amphitheatre

The entire Craiger Parker family was on campus on July 1, 2003 for the dedication ceremony. The Craiger C. Parker Amphitheatre provides an outdoor venue for students to fellowship or to participate in classes or other events. Engraved pavers share special words from donors whose gifts helped make the amphitheater a reality. Dean Parker lost his battle to cancer while working at Central Penn.  A plaque honoring him for his leadership, military and community service, as well as his dedication and service to Central Penn displays his success story and forms the podium.  Dean Parker's values mirrored those of the College, and Central Penn's Core Values are showcased at the top of the amphitheater.

Fred Hall and Kathi Hall

Bart and Jean Milano decided to name the fourth and fifth residence halls in honor of two children from two different families who were best friends of the Milanos.   Both left this world too soon.  Kathi Hall is named in honor of Kathi Spragg, who at the age of 4 ½ slipped through a tube in the Delaware River and drowned.  Fred Hall is named in honor of Fred Neumann from Connecticut.  He was a pre-med student serving as a counselor in Boy Scout camp, and while attempting to rescue a scout who was drowning, Fred drowned.  He was 19 years old.  Fred's father served with Bart Milano in Hawaii during World War II.

Gale Hall

The first residence hall was built in 1970 and was named for Bart and Jean Milano's first born daughter, Gale.

George J. Miller, Jr. Arboretum

As part of a 2008 campus beautification project, the College's arboretum was named in honor of its dear friend and scholarship contributor, George J. Miller, Jr. (1918-2008). 

Henszey's Bridge

This single span wrought-iron bowstring truss was based on the 1869 patent of Joseph Henszey, and kept his name when it traveled across three counties to rest on Central Penn's Summerdale campus. From 2002 until 2010, this historic bridge served not only as a pedestrian walkway, but also represented the College's mission to serve students. A bridge logo was developed with the tag line Your Bridge to Success that appeared on letterhead, envelopes, and other College materials.  It all began with College President Todd A. Milano's vision of using an old bridge to cross the chasm and join both parts of campus.  Harolld J. Stahle, Jr. '44 assisted in this unique venture. "We got our hands on a Penn DOT list of bridges that would be destroyed if not sold.  So we saved a piece of remarkable engineering.  Only about a half dozen of these bow string arch bridges exist."  -- Harolld J. Stahle, Jr.  The College was awarded a 2003 Historic Preservation Award for the relocation and preservation of Henszey's Bridge (1869).  Henszey's Bridge still serves as a pedestrian walkway in the middle of campus.

Todd Hall

The second residence hall was added in 1971 and named for the Milano's son, Todd.

Teri Hall

The third residence hall was added in 1971, and was named for the Milano's daughter, Teri.

West Wing

When growth demanded a third academic building, the original building took the name East Wing and the newest building was named the West Wing.  The two buildings were connected by an enclosed breezeway so that students didn't have to brave inclimate weather as they traveled from class to class.

Did You Know?

Apartments & Townhouses

Instead of living in crowded dorms, Central Penn College students experience real-world living environments in either our apartments or our townhouses!

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