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English

An asterisk () denotes a C is required to progress.

ENG101 College Composition I 3 Credits
This course introduces students to academic writing with a specific emphasis on writing
about argument and rhetoric. Students will engage in diagramming the writing situation,
labeling elements of the rhetorical triangle, identifying ethos, pathos, and logos in model
texts, and describing the function of persuasive writing. The course will focus on evaluating
elements of argument, analyzing rhetoric, and engaging in digital and visual literacy best
practices. A minimum grade of “C” must be achieved before enrolling in ENG102 (College
Composition II).

ENG101E College Composition I Enhanced* 3 Credits
This course introduces students to academic writing with a specific emphasis on writing
about argument and rhetoric. Students will engage in diagramming the writing situation,
labeling elements of the rhetorical triangle, identifying ethos, pathos, and logos in model
texts, and describing the function of persuasive writing. The course will focus on evaluating
elements of argument, analyzing rhetoric, and developing and demonstrating mastery
of conventions of academic writing. This course is equivalent to ENG101, but includes
requirements for the use of student services to encourage student success. A minimum
grade of “C” must be achieved before enrolling in ENG 102 (College Composition II).

ENG102 College Composition II 3 Credits
This course expands on the writing skills established in ENG101 by introducing students to
the concept of academic research. Students will learn how to locate, evaluate, and document
sources, and to incorporate them smoothly and ethically into their own writing. Students
will study academic formatting and citation methods as they conduct primary and secondary
research. The course will focus on how to employ research methods that best fit a specific
rhetorical purpose and audience.
Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG220 Business Communications 3 Credits
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of communicating in a professional
business environment. The course covers the planning, organizing, and writing of business
communications including cover letters, resumes, proposals, memos, emails, and reports.
Students will develop skills to communicate effectively in a variety of business situations by
producing business documents that integrate proper conventions of grammar, format,
style, and layout. In addition, the course addresses the ethics of cross-cultural and
intergenerational communications.
Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG225 Introduction to Contemporary World Literature 3 Credits
This survey course introduces students to a selection of contemporary world literature from
the twentieth century to the present. Students will study fiction, poetry, and drama by authors
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from America, Britain, South Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Caribbean as they define
the historical, aesthetic, and social definitions of ‘world literature.’ Discussion will analyze
issues of globalization, poverty, identity, social justice, and colonialism among others and
determine the role of literature and creative work in the modern world.
Prerequisite: ENG102

ENG300 Creative Writing 3 Credits
An intensive writing course where students will read and analyze the works of published
authors and then produce their own creative material. All creative material will be work
shopped in class by students with the professor directing the discussion. Class size will be
small to encourage the free flow of ideas and criticism regarding student work. The genres
within which students will write are poetry and fiction.
Prerequisite: ENG102

ENG310 Selected Topics in Literature 3 Credits
The topic of this course is determined during the academic term that it is offered. This topic
will relate to a specific area of literature and/or an intensive study of the life and works of one
particular author. Students will use their writing and research skills to participate in
this course.
Prerequisite: ENG102

ENG330 Contemporary American Writers of Color 3 Credits
This course will survey the literary movements that involve contemporary American writers
of color, including African Americans, Native Americans, and Latino Americans. Students will
engage with genres including fiction, poetry, and literary criticism written by contemporary
authors of color. The course will address not only the ways that these writers have engaged
with their current cultural movement, but also how their writing reflects historical, social, and
cultural contexts.
Prerequisite: ENG102

ENG335 Literature and Work 3 Credits
This course will require students to read and analyze a variety of literary texts to answer
questions such as: How is work defined? Who decides on this definition? How do our
ideas about work rely on the cultural myth of the American Dream? How does literature
portray the working-class man and woman? And how do literary texts reinforce or refute the
traditional definitions of work? This course will focus particularly on how gender, race, and
class contribute to our understanding of work and how work can both uplift and dehumanize
certain individuals. We will also examine the ethics of labor. This class will help students better
understand how literature reflects and challenges preconceived notions of work and the
working class.
Prerequisite: ENG102

ENG405 American War Literature Since 1945 3 Credits
World War II helped to shape the culture, economy, art, and philosophy in contemporary
American society. By examining war literature from the post-World War II era until today’s
modern conflicts with Iraq and Afghanistan, this course challenges students to breakdown
the relationship between the destructiveness of war and the creativity of art. In this course,
students will study a variety of selected war literature (poetry, drama, short story, novel,
personal memoir, nonfiction, and film) to examine how writers shaped the experiences of war.
They will distinguish between the different purposes of the literature, the effect it had at the
time it was written, and the effect it still has on readers today.
Prerequisite: ENG102

ENG425 Writing for Digital Media 3 Credits
In this course, students will learn how to put their tweeting, texting, posting, blogging,
emailing and chatting abilities to use in professional, digital spaces. Through examination
and analysis, students will study the creation, exchange, and reception of digital texts, how
these texts impact professional reputations, and how to shape your online presence. Topics
in the course will include website navigation, social media, digital literacy, and current issues.
Students will be expected to create their own texts in various modes and styles including
blogging, social media, websites, emails and proposals and share them in digital venues.
Prerequisite: ENG102

ENG430 Selected Topics in Rhetoric 3 Credits
This course analyzes special issues within the discipline of rhetoric. Students will analyze
the role, impact, and influence of rhetoric in a variety of contexts. Students will analyze the
rhetorical situation, visual and digital rhetoric, and rhetorical strategies. Topics may include
politics, current events, identity, and popular culture.

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